Nursing License Verification: Into the 21st Century

Nursing license verification has become much simpler in the age of the internet. With a few keystrokes, a nurse's credentials can be displayed, along with any disciplinary actions on his or her license. Individuals only have to go to the state board of nursing in their particular state and search by name. This online method is the primary way that nurses display their credentials.

We are fortunate that nursing license verification has become a more simple process in recent years. It can help an employer immediately vet a potential candidate for a position, and provide greater transparency to the public for disciplinary action. It also can remind busy nurses when it is time to renew their nursing license with just a few clicks! It has often been chosen as the sneaky way for NCLEX test takers to find out if they passed before the test results are officially released to the individual. Prospective nurses simply keep checking the board of nursing in their state for their name and to see if their status has been updated.

Typically, a registered nursing license is a little less impressive than you would expect after several years of hard work. It is a printed piece of paper, slightly larger than a driver's license, with your name and license number. It's not even laminated, and grocery store loyalty cards are more durable. Let's just say that the actual nursing license is more appropriate for putting in a safe with other important documents like your birth certificate rather than framing it on a wall.

If a nurse has an office and wants to show off his or her achievement, then a framed diploma certificate from your college or university can be a way to do this. However, most nurses don't have offices so a framed diploma will look just as good in your own home.

The few nurses that do actually have a dedicated office are typically advanced practice nurses or nurse managers who have sought additional degrees to supplement their RN licensure. These accomplished individuals often have trouble listing their credentials after their names. The proper way is to list the highest degree obtained first, like BSN or PhD, followed by the licensure, RN, and then list, if there are any state designations like NP, followed by national certifications like RN-BC (board certified). Finally, awards and other relevant certifications round out the alphabet soup of nursing credentials.

Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons

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Tags: associate degree in nursing, LPN, nursing, Registered Nursing

Kyleigh Roessner RN-BSN

About Kyleigh Roessner RN-BSN

As a newly graduated nurse from Arizona State University's BSN program, I have a unique perspective into the nursing world. I have the recent experience of being a nursing student, as well as the excitement of adapting to life as a new graduate nurse. My social circle includes nurses of many fields and levels of experience as well as physicians in a variety of disciplines. My viewpoint will be of interest to the readers of fortis.edu as they embark on their journey to becoming registered nurses, because of my passion for the field and my experience. View all posts by Kyleigh Roessner RN-BSN →