Army Nurse: An Army of One

Army nurses care for soldiers and their families, at home and abroad, and in times of peace and war. They are a part of the Army Nurse Corps, a group that supports soldiers by providing excellent nursing care. So how do you become a part of this organization, and is it right for you and your family?

By far, the best way to get into an Army nursing program is while you are at nursing school. The Army provides educational benefits that can help make school more affordable. The Army doesn't have their own nursing school, so they may pay for you to obtain your bachelor's degree at a nursing school near you. A bachelor's degree in nursing is the preferred degree to pursue. The best way to find out more is by talking to a recruiter. They can provide you with more specific details about perks, requirements and the process as a whole.

If you are already a nurse, the Army offers a loan repayment of up to $120,000. If you choose this path, becoming an Army nurse is slightly more difficult. You will be required to apply, and you must be between the ages of 21 and 42. You will need at least one year of experience in the field of nursing you wish to enter. Again, a recruiter will be able to guide you through this process.

There are many nurse occupations available in the Army Nurse Corps. From medical-surgical nursing to obstetric nursing, the careers in the Army are varied. All nurses will be required to attend a basic officer leader course, which will effectively prepare you to be an officer in the Army.

Joining the Army as a nurse involves signing a contract that can range from four to eight years. You would be obligated to go where the Army needs you, and this may include areas far away from your family. The pay may or may not be comparable to the pay in your area, although there are housing allowances and bonuses to account for. The Army Nurse Corps has a Reserve Component for part-time service, which allows you to stay in your home area and participate monthly. Nurses can also be called up and deployed, depending on the needs of the Army.

The opportunity to serve is a privilege, and it may not be the best path for everyone. For those who wish to serve their country through nursing, the Army is an excellent option to consider.

Photo Source: Flickr

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Tags: LPN, nursing, Registered Nursing

Kyleigh Roessner RN-BSN

About Kyleigh Roessner RN-BSN

As a newly graduated nurse from Arizona State University's BSN program, I have a unique perspective into the nursing world. I have the recent experience of being a nursing student, as well as the excitement of adapting to life as a new graduate nurse. My social circle includes nurses of many fields and levels of experience as well as physicians in a variety of disciplines. My viewpoint will be of interest to the readers of fortis.edu as they embark on their journey to becoming registered nurses, because of my passion for the field and my experience. View all posts by Kyleigh Roessner RN-BSN →